Mortons Neuroma Symptoms

Overview

Morton neuromaMorton’s neuroma is an inflammation of the nerves in the foot that go to the toes. Although the name includes the word ?neuroma,? it is not really a tumor. It can affect any of the toes in the foot. However, it most often affects the nerves that run between the third and fourth, or second and third toes.

Causes

The cause of this problem is often due to impingement of the plantar nerve fibres between the metatarsal heads and the intermetatarsal ligament. It is entirely a biomechanical phenomenon. Differential diagnoses include stress fracture, capsulitis, bursitis or ligament injury at the metatarsal-phalangeal joint, a tendon sheath ganglion, foreign-body reaction and nerve-sheath tumour.

Symptoms

Symptoms include tingling in the space between the third and fourth toes, toe cramping, a sharp, shooting, or burning pain in the ball of the foot and sometimes toes, pain that increases when wearing shoes or pressing on the area, pain that gets worse over time. In rare cases, nerve pain occurs in the space between the second and third toes. This is not a common form of Morton neuroma, but treatment is similar.

Diagnosis

The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Initial diagnosis of Morton’s neuroma is based on your description of the type and location of pain and discomfort in the foot. The diagnosis will be confirmed by a physical exam of the foot, including checking for mechanical abnormalities in the foot, squeezing the side of the foot, which will usually cause pain when Morton’s neuroma is present. Examination of your shoes to check for excess wear in parts of the shoe, check to see whether the shoes are too tight. Imaging tests evaluate the foot and surrounding structures. This may be done with X-ray, MRI scan, Ultrasound. Injections of local anesthetic can also be used for diagnosis.

Non Surgical Treatment

Sclerosing alcohol injections are an increasingly available treatment alternative if the above management approaches fail. Dilute alcohol (4%) is injected directly into the area of the neuroma, causing toxicity to the fibrous nerve tissue. Frequently, treatment must be performed 2-4 times, with 1-3 weeks between interventions. An 60-80% success rate has been achieved in clinical studies, equal to or exceeding the success rate for surgical neurectomy with fewer risks and less significant recovery. If done with more concentrated alcohol under ultrasound guidance, the success rate is considerably higher and fewer repeat procedures are needed. Radio Frequency Ablation is also used in the treatment of Morton’s Neuroma The outcomes appear to be equally or more reliable than alcohol injections especially if the procedure is done under ultrasound guidance.

Surgical Treatment

For those who are suffering severely with Morton?s Neuroma, surgery is a possibility. An orthopedic surgeon can remove the growth and repair your foot relatively easily. However, Morton?s Neuroma surgery is associated with a lengthy recovery time and there is a possibility that the neuroma may return.